Looking Back: 9/8

Myron Fischer, of Ferdinand, casts in hopes of hooking a second bass during a slow afternoon of fishing at the Huntingburg Conservation Club lake. "The fish don't seem to be in the mood today, but I'm hoping to find a non-conformist," he said. But he admitted the chances weren't good. "A lot of times you can't buy a strike when a cold front comes in," he said. Fischer has been a fisherman for most of his 58 years. Herald file photo by Mark T. Osler. Published Sept. 9, 1993.

Compiled by Bob Alles

65 Years Ago
Sept. 7, 1953   

Labor Day, no paper.

Sept. 8

Funeral services will be held at 2 o’clock this afternoon in the Schmutzler Funeral Home in Huntingburg for Chris Winkenhoefer, owner and operator of the Gem Theatre. Rev. Fred Fahrenkamp, pastor of Salem Ev. and Reformed Church of which Mr. Winkenhoefer was a member, will officiate. Burial will be in Fairmont Cemetery. Mr. Winkenhoefer, who was 61, died at 4:45 Sunday morning in the Stork Memorial Hospital of injuries which he suffered in a fall down the projection room stairs of the theatre Saturday night.  Mr. Winkenhoefer, who had operated the theatre for about 40 years, served much of the time as a projectionist. He was descending the steps from the projection room to the main floor of the theatre when he fell. He had been troubled with a heart condition for some time, and it is believed he may have suffered a heart attack, causing him to lose his balance. He suffered head injuries that caused his death.

Sept. 9

Jasper High School’s 1953 football squad — the first in more than two score years — will be divided for a full length game tomorrow night in the Wildcats’ first public appearance since the recent fans’ clinic. Kickoff time will be 7:30. This action comes just a day over a week from the team’s opening game of the season which will take them to Jasonville on Friday evening, Sept. 18. The boys worked on proper alignment for kickoffs, then held a brisk scrimmage yesterday afternoon. The squad roster numbers 37. All but four of the boys are underclassmen. Everybody in uniform probably will see action before the intrasquad game is ended. Two big batteries of outfield floodlights from the baseball diamond have been switched around to help illuminate the gridiron, situated between the baseball field and St. Joseph’s School playground. Four utility poles on the east side of the football field carry additional lights. The gridiron was lighted for the first time last night after the workmen had completed the changeover. Bleachers from the gym are being erected on both sides of the football field, which lies inside the cinder oval used for track meets. There will be approximately 900 bleacher seats available. 

Sept. 10

John H. Wuchner of Jasper has been appointed by President Eisenhower as a member of the Dubois County selective service board to succeed the late Otto Schwinghammer. Mr. Wuchner was appointed by the president on the recommendation of Indiana’s governor, George Craig. Mr. Wuchner, who is employed as a shipping clerk by the Jasper Chair Company, has served as state chaplain of the American Legion and is at present the district chaplain of the Legion. Mr. Schwinghammer, who died on August 31, had served as a member of the board since September of 1951, as a chairman since February of this year.   

Sept. 11

Close to a thousand spectators last night saw the first schoolboy football game in Jasper in some 20 years--and the first JHS squad in action in more than twice that length of time--as the Whites defeated the Blacks 31-18 in an intrasquad tilt. Thirty-eight boys got into the game before it was over. There was a swap of a couple of linemen on each side at the half; otherwise, the squad remained split for the evening and the boys gave it the old try from the start to the finish. Game officials were the best in the business — Referee Ox Hartley, Umpire Jiggs Devault and Head Linesman Arad McCutchan. The Evansville whistle tooters and handkerchief throwers were kept pretty tolerably busy all evening. 

Sept. 12

The body of the only Dubois County soldier definitely known to have lost his life in Korea was scheduled to be returned to his home town of Huntingburg this afternoon. The casket containing the remains of 23-year-old Pfc. George E. “Buddy” Dittmer was slated to arrive at Washington, Indiana, by train at 1:19 this afternoon and be taken from there to the Schmutzler Funeral Home in Huntingburg. The body is being escorted by a cousin of the deceased, Cpl. Glenn Thomas Dittmer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mike Dittmer of Huntingburg. The remains will be at the Schmutzler Funeral Home until Tuesday morning, when services will be held at in St. Mary’s Church at 8 o’clock. Officiating at the requiem mass will be Father August Fichter of Jasper, a cousin of the deceased. Burial will be in the church cemetery. 

50 Years Ago
Sept. 9, 1968

Pictured on the front page of this issue is a brand new Lear Jet airplane, the first jet ever to land in Dubois County. It is shown as it cut the crepe paper ribbon stretched across the runway  to officially open the expanded Huntingburg Municipal Airport facility Sunday afternoon. Owned by Dolly Madison Industries, Inc., which has plants in Huntingburg, the jet ribbon-cutting concluded dedication ceremonies which preceded the renewal of the Huntingburg Jaycees Lincolnland Airshow. Shown on the picture holding one end of the ribbon  as the plane hit it is Chuck Scales, manager of the airport. A crowd estimated at upwards of 7,000 people was on hand for the dedication and airshow.   

Sept. 10

Emanuel United Methodist Church of Huntingburg will observe its 125th anniversary as a congregation on Sunday, Sept. 22. Since the organization of the congregation in 1843 in the home of Gerhard Niehaus near Huntingburg, the Emanuel Church has had a long history in the Huntingburg community and at the Maple Grove campground west of the city. The old Salem Church at Maple Grove was the mother church of the congregation, built in 1844 of rough-hewn logs. It was the meeting place of all Evangelicals from Huntingburg and the community around Maple Grove until the first Evangelical Church was erected in Huntingburg in 1849. Since those early beginnings, several different church buildings and parsonages have been constructed and used by the congregation. The church building in use today, at the corner of Fourth and Geiger Street, was constructed in 1904 with the Christian Education unit being added in 1926. The parsonage in use today, located at 211 Fourth Street, was built in 1958-59. 

Sept. 11

From Jerry Birge’s Keeping Score column: The list of Jasper High School coaches this year features a few new names including Rex May. The former Dubois coach is starting his first year on the Jasper staff and this Thursday he will make his debut as coach of the JHS cross country team. Jasper cross country teams have been about as successful at winning meets in recent years as the Chicago Cubs have been at winning National League pennants. In other words, it has been a long time since Jasper has even won a meet let alone had an overall successful season in cross country. The Jasper cross country team this season lists only three letterman, including one boy who lettered in Nebraska, but coach May is still hopeful of producing a winner — something Jasper hasn’t had in the sport in a while. 

Sept. 12 

Jasper’s versatile mayor Jack Newton will serve as master of ceremonies at the recognition dinner for the American Legion’s 50th anniversary celebration on September 21. The dinner which will honor 50-year charter members, past commanders, past auxiliary presidents and Gold Star Mothers, will be held in the Tenth Street School cafeteria beginning at 6:30 p.m. Jerry Huls, chairman of the recognition dinner, said tickets are now on sale for $2.50 each. Plans are being made to accommodate 450 persons. Featured speaker at the banquet will be Captain Robert Konkle , operations commander of the Indiana State Police.   

Sept. 13

From Jerry Birge’s Keeping Score column: Work was started this week on the installations of the new grass infield on the baseball diamond at Recreation Field in Jasper. Park and Recreation director Jim Brown, Linus Knebel and members of the Dubois County Green Thumb, an organization sponsored by the Indiana Farmers Union, started work on Monday and they have already installed 1380 feet of 4” field tile and 250 feet of 6” tile that will drain the field professionally. The tile has been laid, covered with pea gravel and dirt. The infield will be raised four inches.   

Sept. 14

Awarding of contracts for the construction of the first academic building on the Jasper campus of St. Benedict College was announced this morning by the Board of Trustees of the college. The general construction contract will go to Krempp Lumber Co. of Jasper. Hughes-Bechtol of Dayton, Ohio, was awarded the electrical contract in the amount of $176,733. The bid of $282,000 by Koenig Bros. of Louisville for the mechanical contract was accepted. Hasenour and Sternberg of Jasper will do the site development. Their bid for this work was $144,867.50. Total cost of the construction project will be $1,414,495.

25 Years Ago
Sept. 6, 1993

Labor Day, no paper.

Sept. 7

From the Youth in Action column by Kendall Martin: The Boilermakers of Purdue University cordially invite 4-H’ers, their parents and friends to a fun-filled day on the West Lafayette campus on Saturday, Oct. 2. On this day, appropriately designated 4-H Day, 4-H families can attend a Big Ten football game featuring Purdue vs. Illinois at a reduced price. Also included will be tours of the athletic facilities and campus.  The 4-H Day at Purdue is an opportunity for 4-H members to see student life and activities at Purdue.

The first responders of the Dubois Volunteer Fire Department recently became the first fire department in Dubois County to implement a First Responder Defibrillation Program. The department has been certified by the State Emergency Management Agency as a basic life support non-transport unit. 

Sept. 8

Huntingburg’s St. Joseph’s Hospital Auxiliary recently approved the purchase of a $140,000 telephone system for the hospital, including voice mail and direct inward dialing, which lets callers call directly to a patient’s room or employee’s office. The system includes the hospital’s offices in the Outreach East building on east Sixth Street; Home health and hospice, chemical dependency, fiscal service, and the business office. The auxiliary raises funds through the hospital gift shop, flower sales, craft/bake sales, and a raffle. For more information, call Michelle Eckert at 683-6132.

Sept. 9

Last year’s water rate hike raised water bills for the town of Holland as well as its residents  but also caused a shortfall in the account used to pay for fire hydrant rental. The town council introduced an ordinance at its Wednesday night meeting for an additional appropriation of $16,706 from another account to make up for the shortfall for the remainder of the year. The council will act on the ordinance at next month’s meeting.

The J-Men’s Club elected their 1993-94 board members and officers at a meeting Wednesday night. The officers, which are third-year members, are President Dwain Merder, Vice-President Danny Fuhs, Treasurer Mike Ackerman, and Secretary Kurt Gutgsell. The board includes Ron Schitter, Carey Schneider, Bill Kaiser, Phil Snith, and P. J. Wessel.

Sept. 10

During a week in which Chevy Chase joined the late night scene and David Letterman joked that NASA was launching a bloodhound with a jet pack to hunt down Mars Observer, Jay Leno mothballed the desk Kimball made for his “Tonight Show” set. A Kimball Connex series desk and chair debuted with Leno in May 1992. He has kept the chair but gone to a different desk. Dennis Guillaume, director of education and training for Kimball’s office furniture division, said “The Tonight Show” told Kimball about the change. 

Sept. 11

The trouble with momentum is that it has a tendency to change. The Jasper Wildcats know all about that. They were caught in the middle of three sudden changes Friday night and the result was a 21-8 loss to Tell City at Alumni Stadium. Meanwhile, Heritage Hills overwhelmed its third straight opponent Friday in posting a 38-0 victory over conference foe Southridge in a game played at Lincoln City. The Patriots thus far have outscored their opposition 117-13 during the 1993 season.   




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