Photographer of the Year (Small Market)

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    Northwood Retirement Community resident Lillian Cannon playfully took aim with her squirt gun at volunteers helping to host a pool party for the residents of the Jasper nursing home in the home's activities room Tuesday. The residents enjoyed dirt pudding and slushies while playing several water games with the three volunteers and staff. After having a water balloon popped over her, Cannon responded by saying, "I don't care as long as we are having fun."

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    A crossbred heifer named Storm nuzzled up against Elizabeth Brinkman of Huntingburg, 16, as she rested with her cattle at the Dubois County 4-H Fair.

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    IHSAA rules for two-a-day practices prohibit the teams from running full contact drills on the first two days of practices. The Forest Park team ran through plays the morning of the second day of two-a-day practices.

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    High school friends of Lance Cpl. Alec Terwiske, including Logan Ingle, left, Lance Cpl. Tyler Lampert, Lance Cpl. Ben Knies and Lance Cpl. Corey Freyberger shared hugs following Terwiske's funeral at St. Celestine Catholic Church. Terwiske, 21, died while serving in Afghanistan on Sept. 3.

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    The Southridge football team huddled together for a team prayer before the start of Friday night's game against Clarksville at Raider Field in Huntingburg. The Raiders won 48-14.

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    Jasper seniors Kirk Stenftenagel, left, Issac Lechner, Mark Giesler and Nate Messier spent halftime during Friday night's Class 4A sectional championship game against Evansville Reitz in a hunting blind at Jerry Brewer Alumni Stadium in Jasper. The Wildcats lost 31-30.

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    Providence Home Health Care Center cook Becky Partenheimer danced with resident Kenny Aders as they listened to the music of Louisville performer Jeff Rehmet as he played on his electric piano and sang songs Wednesday at the Jasper nursing home. The performance is part of an outreach series started this week by the Jasper Arts Center to take the arts to area nursing homes.

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    Brother Macario Martinez-Arjona paused briefly at the end of each row of gravestones in the cemetery at the Saint Meinrad Archabbey as he exited the grounds following an observance of All Saints' Day on Thursday evening. Following the prayer, seminarians proceeded from the archabbey chapel to the cemetery, carrying candles to place on each of the headstones.

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    Several members of the Forest Park varsity baseball team hopped and clicked their heals together as they ran in between innings during Wednesday's Class 2A baseball sectional against Tell City at League Stadium in Huntingburg.

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    Moving Day — Judy Schmetzer took a seat on the couch in the living room of the Holland home of her brother Randy Boehm while her then-caretaker Michaela Daugherty of Huntingburg and Randy carried Judy’s belongings to the car to move her to The Waters of Huntingburg. Judy had been living with her brother and his wife, Virginia, since 2009, a time when she could no longer live alone because her Alzheimer’s disease and vision were worsening. But as Virginia’s own battle with colon cancer worsened as well, the couple had to make the tough decision to place Judy where her increasing need for assistance could be met.

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    Before Judy moved into The Waters of Huntingburg, all of her personal belongings had to be tagged with her identification to keep them from being confused with other residents’ belongings.

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    Judy Schmetzer, who battles memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease and declining vision caused by a stroke in 2009, had spent the last couple of years receiving personal care while living with her brother Randy Boehm and his wife, Virginia. As Judy's needs began to grow, the Boehms, with Judy's input, decided she needed to live in an environment that could better fulfill her needs. The routine Judy had developed living with the Boehms was uprooted with the move to The Waters, making the transition for Judy a frustrating challenge. As she has familiarized herself with the nursing home and the residents, Judy is becoming more comfortable at the residence and participating in more activities.

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    Judy received help from her then-caretaker Michaela Daugherty in navigating her way into The Waters of Huntingburg.

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    After receiving help from Randy and Virginia Boehm with arranging the furniture in her room at The Waters of Huntingburg, Schmetzer tested out the comfort of her bed.

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    After helping Judy get settled in her new room at The Waters of Huntingburg, Virginia Boehm and her husband, Randy, said their goodbyes before returning to their Holland home.

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    “The best thing is to just join in. I don’t want to sit around,” Judy said. about adjusting to her transition from living at home to living at The Waters of Huntingburg. The first couple of weeks after moving into the nursing home, Judy struggled with getting involved with the other residents and the activities, but with the help of encouragement from the staff and residents, she slowly has been coming around.

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    "This is the most frustrating part," Judy said as she struggled to use her utensils during lunch. Fellow resident Joan Alstott helped Judy eat her sandwich by holding it up for Judy to more easily find with her hands.

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    In an attempt to help Judy learn to navigate the halls at The Waters of Huntingburg on her own, Judy’s then-caretaker Michaela Daugherty tried to teach Judy how to find the waist-high railings along the walls. Judy suffered a stroke in 2009 that caused her vision to gradually worsen.

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    To help keep her mobility, Judy joined other residents at The Waters of Huntingburg in an exercise workout called “seniorcising” led by activity assistant Vicki Houchin. Judy said she misses being able to get out and go for walks on her own but has found activities like the exercise class to be helpful in staying active.

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    Ethel Flamion, left, leaned in to introduce herself to Judy after the women were seated next to each other in the dining hall at The Waters of Huntingburg.

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    Stepping Forward — Levi Leffert lost his leg in a lawn mower accident when he was 5. It did anything but slow him down. Nearly an hour and a half after arriving at Shriners Hospital for Children in St. Louis to pick up his new prosthetic leg, Levi Leffert waited while the leg was being adjusted. It took nearly two hours and several adjustments for the prosthetic to get to the point where Levi felt comfortable enough to take it home.

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    Ferdinand Elementary students listened intently as Levi Leffert of St. Meinrad told the story of when he was 5 years old and was involved in a lawn mower accident that cut off the backside of his left leg. After dealing with several years of pain after the accident, Levi opted to have a portion of the leg amputated in April 2010. Levi speaks to students at local elementary schools to teach them about lawn mower safety in hopes they won’t have to experience what he did.

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    Ferdinand Elementary fourth-graders Hunter Helming, left, and Megan Gogel, right, were no match for the speed of Levi Leffert of St. Meinrad despite him having a prosthetic leg as he raced the two in the school’s gym. The race was part of the presentation Levi gave to the school’s third- and fourth-graders about lawn mower safety in which he recounted how he was caught beneath the deck of a lawn mower when he was 5 years old and his injury eventually led him to have a portion of his left leg and foot amputated.

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    Prosthetists at Shriners Hospital for Children in St. Louis have told Levi Leffert of St. Meinrad that they can’t make a brace that he can’t break, as he once managed to break one that was said to be unbreakable. Levi keeps many of his old braces and shows them to students during his classroom presentations.

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    By the time Levi reached seventh grade, his leg could no longer stand the stress of playing sports. Since then, Levi has taken up outdoor activities like fishing, hunting and four-wheeler riding. Levi scanned the trees on his neighbor’s property as he hunted for squirrels.

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    After having a rough day during which he spent most of the 10-hour workday at Holiday World limping, Levi Leffert reclined in a chair while chatting with his dad, Mark, in their St. Meinrad home. It’s common for Levi after long days of work to have to remove his prosthetic limb and massage his leg.

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    Having been through multiple legs since his amputation, Levi Leffert of St. Meinrad uses one of his older ones as his swimming leg. Levi leapt off of the diving board to catch a football as he spent time swimming with friends after work at the St. Henry Community Club.

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    “I mow all of the time. It doesn’t bother me a bit,” Levi Leffert of St. Meinrad said. Levi, who eventually lost his left leg after a mowing accident in 1999, often helps his dad mow his family’s property as well as some neighbors’ property. He mowed a neighbor’s property.

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    A Family Tradition — Every year for dozens of years, the Schwenk family has gathered at the family farm for a weekend of hog butchering. The tradition goes back to the days when farm families gathered to share the work and put the meat on the table. Four generations helped with this year's butchering. Logan Niehaus of Ireland, 12, center, took aim at one of the pigs with a .22-caliber rifle as his cousins Jared Schwenk of Jasper, 12, left, Travis Main of Ireland, Chase Schwenk of Jasper, 16, and family friend Brian Schmitt of Ireland watched. Most of the young men took a turn at shooting a pig.

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    A tradition that began with Herb Schwenk’s family before his time has continued annually over the years on the family farm in Ireland. Now 87 years old, Herb has passed on the knowledge to keep the tradition alive to his children, grandchildren, in-laws and some family friends. Herb’s son Keith Schwenk of Ireland checked the temperature of a vat filled with water and quicklime on the morning of Jan. 13. “It’s my magic potion,” he said jokingly. After the hogs are killed, they are placed in the mixture heated to 145 degrees, a temperature high enough to loosen hair from the body without cooking the pig.

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    Mike Schwenk of Ireland, Herb’s oldest son, hosed down the hogs before processing them. The organs — kidneys, livers, spleens, lungs, hearts and sweetbreads — are all put into separate piles to be used later. The only portions of a pig that the Schwenks don’t use are the stomach and the intestines. The family butchered 16 hogs this year.

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    The Schwenk family has been taught by Herb to use every part of the pig possible, including the head. The family turn the heads into head cheese, which several family members said is best served on a cracker with spicy mustard. The only portion of the pigs not used are the stomach and the intestines.

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    No members of the family shy away from any portion of the butchering, no matter how dirty the task.

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    With the farthest-away family member traveling from Evansville, all 12 of Herb’s children and many of their spouses and children come together to help with the family tradition throughout the weekend. Ron Schwenk of Ireland, second from left, laughed with his sister Shelly Main of Ireland as Ron processed a pig’s head. Also helping with the process was Shelly’s husband, Roy, left, and her son, Travis, right.

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    Rendering the lard was one of the last tasks the Schwenk family finished Jan. 14 before the final cleanup began. The rendering process requires the lard to be constantly stirred, so Mark Kordes of Jasper, clockwise from front left around the kettle, Roy Main of Ireland, Nicholas Hoffman of Birdseye, 16, and Nathan Verkamp of Jasper took turns stirring the lard. Josh Dahmer of Evansville, back left, watched and helped stir as well.

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    Hannah Schwenk of Jasper, 9, watched as the head cheese was mixed. While some of the family members don’t like the head cheese, the several members that do say it’s best served on a cracker with spicy mustard.

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    During the annual hog butchering weekend, family members make ground pork sausage, liver sausage, blood sausage, head cheese, pickled pigs feet and lard and carve the meat into select cuts.

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    Marilyn “Toot” Schwenk of Ireland handed her brother-in-law Roy Main of Ireland a freshly cooked piece of liver as she made liver and onions for the family to eat for lunch on the second day of butchering.