Enduring the Test of Time

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    Jon Hurst of Dale used an electric hoist to transport a monument from inside the building at Schum Monuments in Dale to a lot outside Sept. 19. Schum Monuments was founded 125 years ago by Andrew Schum Sr., who later sold the company to his sons Benno and Andrew Jr. Jack Troth married BennoÕs daughter Sandy and has been in charge of the company since the late 1970s. Two of Jack and SandyÕs children, Chris and Susan, are a part of the company. Dave Weatherwax/The Herald

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    Garrett Southwood of Newburgh, left, and Jon Hurst of Dale pushed the large hoist along the track as they worked to fill an empty spot with a new monument stone in the lot outside the business Sept. 19. The businessÕ original building still stands, but in the 125 years of the business, several additions have been made. Dave Weatherwax/The Herald

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    Chris Troth, left, and his father, Jack, worked on stencil work for two monuments in their shop at Schum Monuments on Sept. 19 to prepare them to be sandblasted. Before sandblasting was used to create the artwork and lettering on a stone, it had to be done by hand, which often would be the ÒsignatureÓ of the individual who carved it, Jack said. Today, the stones look uniform in the cemetery because of the stencils and sandblasting. Dave Weatherwax/The Herald

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    Jack Troth cut out the lettering stencil to prepare a monument to be sandblasted Sept. 19. Before sandblasting was used to create the artwork and lettering on a stone, it had to be done by hand, which often would be the ÒsignatureÓ of the individual who carved it, Jack said. Today, the stones look uniform in the cemetery because of the stencils and sandblasting. Dave Weatherwax/The Herald

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    Chris Troth slipped on a protective glove as he suited up to sandblast a monument Sept. 19. Dave Weatherwax/The Herald

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    Whenever an employee has a birthday, co-workers make and share a lunch together in celebration. Sandy Troth, second from right, cut the homemade strawberry cake while her daughter, Susan Teaford, scooped the ice cream Sept. 19 to celebrate the birthday of Don Werne of Dale, second from left. At left is Jack Troth. Dave Weatherwax/The Herald

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    Don Werne of Dale fed a piece of food to the shop cat, Dusty, during his lunch break Sept. 19. Dusty has been roaming the shop for nearly five years and earned his name Òjust because everything in here is so dusty,Ó Chris Troth said. Dave Weatherwax/The Herald

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    Several drawers in the workshop at Schum Monuments are filled with thousands of sheets of tracing paper that have artwork on them that is traced on monuments time and again. Some of the drawings are a good 75 years old, Jack Troth said. ÒIf not older.Ó Dave Weatherwax/The Herald

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    Jon Hurst of Dale, left, and Garrett Southwood of Newburgh used a crane on the back of the company truck to unload a monument at Fairview Cemetery in Jasper on Nov. 20. The two men set five monuments that morning. Dave Weatherwax/The Herald

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    After installing a monument at Fairview Cemetery in Jasper on Nov. 20, Jon Hurst of Dale scrubbed it clean. Hurst and co-worker Garrett Southwood of Newburgh installed five monuments that morning. Dave Weatherwax/The Herald

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    Don Werne of Dale on Sept. 19 sculpted concrete around a monument stone that will help protect the stone from lawn mowers and weed trimmers. Werne has worked for the family-owned business for nearly 20 years. Dave Weatherwax/The Herald