A New Life for Old Things

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    Mike McBride of Shoals, left, and Marsha Seifert and Mary Beth Edwards, both of Portersville, removed an old window from the house of the late Connie Whittinghill in French Lick on June 3. After acquiring permission from the current homeowner, Deanne Burger of French Lick, who is WhittinghillÕs daughter, Mary Beth and Marsha have taken several trips to the house to remove items they want to resell in their store, 231 Antiques and More in Haysville. Every time they found a hidden treasure, theyÕd say aloud, ÒThank you, Connie.Ó Rachel Mummey/The Herald

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    Marsha, Mary Beth and McBride worked together to get an old window to budge from the house of the late Connie Whittinghill on June 3. Rachel Mummey/The Herald

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    Mary Beth and Marsha shared their excitement after finding a vintage 1950s Zenith record player at the house of the late Connie Whittinghill on June 3. The pair describe themselves as long-lost sisters. Rachel Mummey/The Herald

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    Mary Beth and Marsha worked on refinishing pieces of furniture behind their shop during one of their arts and craft days June 28. The two often paint items to give them a shabby-chic appearance. Rachel Mummey/The Herald

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    Chuck Engelbrecht of Dale, center, negotiated with Bill Sieveking of New Salisbury, left, about buying the entire contents of his house while ChuckÕs wife, Sue, inspected an old license plate July 10. The Engelbrechts, who are members of the Associated Antiques Dealers of America, love to hear the background stories surrounding peopleÕs belongings so they can do extended research to help authenticate the items. Rachel Mummey/The Herald

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    Chuck Engelbrecht inspected a shotgun from the 1950s while going through Bill SievekingÕs household in New Salisbury on July 10. The Engelbrechts bought the entire contents of the Sieveking house. Chuck, 67, was raised on a farm near Dale that didnÕt have electricity or indoor plumbing until the 1950s. He attributes his knowledge of antiques to growing up in an environment surrounded by them. Rachel Mummey/The Herald

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    Bill Sieveking of New Salisbury sat in the living room of his house as he watched Sue and Chuck Engelbrecht of Dale move his belongings into their trailer. The Engelbrechts bought the entire contents of the Sieveking house July 10. Although the Engelbrechts acknowledged that they wouldnÕt be able to resell much of what they acquired in their antiques shop, Grainry Antiques & Other Needful Things in Huntingburg, they were excited about a number of items, including a functional player piano from the early 1900s. Rachel Mummey/The Herald

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    Tommy Schwinghammer of St. Henry kept an eye on two auctions going on at the same time at Hill Haven in Bretzville on June 29. Tommy said he continuously has to buy merchandise because of the quick turnaround his Huntingburg store, Anything Collectible, experiences. Rachel Mummey/The Herald

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    An old apron from Heim Brothers Lumber Co. caught the eye of Tom Schwinghammer of St. Henry as he picked his way through a table of odds and ends during an auction at Hill Haven in Bretzville on June 29. Over the years, Tommy has learned what items will get the attention of his customers. Rachel Mummey/The Herald

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    Tommy Schwinghammer of St. Henry unloaded a truck of furniture for his store in Huntingburg, Anything Collectible, on July 25. Rachel Mummey/The Herald